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Generating code that looks like it is human written

April 11th, 2012 No comments

I am very interested in understanding the patterns of developer behavior that lead to the human characteristics that can be found in code. To help me get some idea of how well I understand this behavior I have decided to build a tool that generates source code that appears to be written by human programmers. I hope to reach a point where I can offer a challenge to tell the difference between generated code and human written code.

The three main production techniques I plan to use are, in increasing order of relatedness to humans production techniques, are:

  1. Random generation based on percentage occurrence of language constructs obtained from measurements of existing source. This is the simplest approach and the one furthest away from common developer behavior; even so there are things that can be learned from this information. For instance, the theory that developers are more likely to create a function once code becomes heavily nested code implies that the probability of encountering an if-statement decreases as nesting depth increases; measurements show the probability of encountering an if-statement remaining approximately constant as depth of nesting increases.
  2. Behavior templates. People have habits in everyday life and also when writing software. While some habits are idiosyncratic and not encountered very often there are some that appear to be generally used. For instance, developers tend to assign a fixed role to every variable they define (e.g., stepper for stepping through a succession of values and most-recent holder holding the latest value encountered in going through a succession of values).

    I am expecting/hoping that generation by behavioral templates will result in code having some of the probabilistic properties seen in human code, removing the need for purely random generation driven by low level language probability measurements. For instance, the probability of a local variable appearing in a function is proportional to the percentage of its previous occurrences up to that point in the source of the function (percentage = occurrences_of_X / occurrences_of_all_local_variables) and I am hoping that this property appears as emergent behavior from generating using the role of variable template.

  3. Story telling. A program is like the plot of a story, it has a cast of characters (e.g., classes, functions, libraries) that perform various actions and interact with each other in order to achieve various goals, there are subplots (intermediate results are calculated, devices are initialized, etc), there are resource limits, etc.

    While a lot of stories are application domain specific there are subplots common to many stories; also how a story is told can be heavily influenced by the language used, for instance Prolog programs have a completely different structure than those written in procedural languages such as Java. I want to stay away from being application specific and I don’t plan to tackle languages too far outside the common-or-garden procedural variety.

    Researchers have created automatic story generators; the early generators were template based while more recent systems have used an agent based approach. Story based generation of code is my ideal, but I am a long way away from having enough knowledge of developer behavior to be more than template based.

In a previous post I described a system for automatically generating very simply C programs. I plan to build on this system to incrementally improve the ‘humanness’ of the generated code. At some point, hopefully before the end of this year, I will challenge people to tell the difference between automatically generated and human written code.

The language I have studied the most is C and this will be the main target. I don’t want to be overly C specific and am trying to decide on a good second language (i.e., lots of source available for measurement, used by lots of developers and not too different from C). JavaScript is the current front runner, it is a class-less object oriented language which is not ‘wildly’ OO (the patterns of usage in human written OO code continue to evolve at a rapid rate which can make a lot of human C++/Java code look automatically generated).

As well as being a test bed for understanding of human generated code other uses for an automatic generator include compiler stress testing and providing code snippets to an automated fault fixing tool.