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SQL usage: schema evolution

January 30th, 2011 No comments

My first serious involvement with SQL, about 15 years ago, was writing a parser for the grammar specified in the ISO SQL-92 Standard. One of the things that surprised me about SQL was how little source code was generally available (for testing) and the almost complete lack of any published papers on SQL usage (its always better to find out about where the pot-holes are from other peoples’ experience).

The source code availability surprie is largely answered by the very close coupling between source and data that occurs with SQL; most SQL source is closely tied to a database schema and unless you have a need to process exactly the same kind of data you are unlikely to have any interest having access to the corresponding SQL source. The growth in usage of MySQL means that these days it is much easier to get hold of large amounts of SQL (large is a relative term here, I suspect that there are probably many orders of magnitude fewer lines of SQL in existence than there is of other popular languages).

In my case I was fortunate in that NIST released their SQL validation suite for beta testing just as I started to test my parser (it had taken me a month to get the grammar into a manageable shape).

Published research on SQL usage continues to be thin on the ground and I was pleased to recently discover a paper combining empirical work on SQL usage with another rarely researched topic, declaration usage e.g., variables and types or in this case schema evolution (for instance, changes in the table columns over time).

The researchers only analyzed one database, the 171 releases of the schema used by Wikipedia between April 2003 and November 2007, but they also made their scripts available for download and hopefully the results of applying them to lots of other databases will be published.

Not being an experienced database person I don’t know how representative the Wikipedia figures are; the number of tables increased from 17 to 34 (100% increase) and the number of columns from 100 to 242 (142%). A factor of two increase sounds like a lot but I suspect that all but one these columns occupy a tiny fraction of the 14GB that is the current English Wikipedia.