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Posts Tagged ‘optimizer’

Superoptimizers are back in vogue

November 6th, 2012 No comments

There has always been the need for a few developer with in-depth knowledge of a particular cpu architecture to sit down and think very hard about how best to implement a snippet of code performing some operation in assembly language, e.g., library implementors wanting the tightest code for a critical inner loop or compiler writers who need to map from intermediate code to machine code.

In 1987 Massalin published his now famous paper that introduced the term Superoptimizer; a program that enumerates all possible combinations of instruction sequences until the shortest/fastest one producing the desired output from the given input is found (various heuristics were used to prune the search space e.g., only considering 15 or so opcodes, and the longest sequence it ever generated contained 12 instructions).

While the idea was widely talked about it never caught on in practice (a special purpose branch eliminator was produced for GCC; Hacker’s Delight also includes a stand alone system). Perhaps the guild of mindbogglingly-obtuse-but-fast-instruction-sequences black-balled it (apprentices have to spend several years doing nothing but writing assembly code for their chosen architecture, thinking about how to make it go faster and/or be shorter and only talk to other apprentices/members and communicate with non-converts exclusively about their latest neat sequence), or perhaps it was just a case of not invented here (writing machine code used to be something that even run of the mill developers got to do every now and again), or perhaps it was not considered cost effective to build a superoptimizer for a given project (I don’t know of anyone offering a generic tool that could be tailored for specific cases) or perhaps developers were happy to just ride the wave of continually faster processors.

It was not until 2008 with Bansal’s thesis that superoptimizer research started to take off (as in paper publication rate increased from once every five years to more than one a year). Bansal found a new market, binary translation i.e., translating the binary of a program built to run on one kind of cpu to run on a different kind of cpu, for instance the Mac 68K emulator.

Bansal and other researchers’ work was oriented towards relatively short instruction sequences. To be really useful some way of handling longer sequences was needed.

A few days ago Stochastic Superoptimization arrived on the scene (or rather a paper describing it became available for download). Schkufza, Sharma and Aiken use Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to sample the possible instruction sequences rather than generating all of them. The paper gives a 116 instruction example from which the author’s tool removed 16 lines to produce code that went 1.6 times faster (only 30 ‘core’ instructions were given in paper); what is also very interesting is that the tool operates on compiler generated output (gcc/llvm), suggesting the usage build program, profile it and then stochastic superoptimize the hot spots.

Markov chains and Monte Carlo methods are trendy topics that researchers like to write about, so we will certainly see more papers in this area.

These days few developers have had hands on experience with machine code, so the depth of expertise that was once easy to find is now rare, processors have many more weird and wonderful instructions often interacting with older instructions in obscure ways and the cpu architecture landscape continues to change regularly. The time may have arrived for Superoptimizers to be widely used by industry.

Of course superoptimizers can work at any level of abstraction, including expression trees built directly from some complicated floating-point calculation that needs to be optimized for accuracy or speed.

Optimizing floating-point expressions for accuracy

December 15th, 2011 1 comment

Floating-point arithmetic is one topic that most compiler writers tend to avoid as much as possible. The majority of programs don’t use floating-point (i.e., low customer demand), much of the analysis depends on the range of values being operated on (i.e., information not usually available to the compiler) and a lot of developers don’t understand numerical methods (i.e., keep the compiler out of the blame firing line by generating code that looks like what appears in the source).

There is a scientific and engineering community whose software contains lots of floating-point arithmetic, the so called number-crunchers. While this community is relatively small, many of the problems it works on attract lots of funding and some of this money filters down to compiler development. However, the fancy optimizations that appear in these Fortran compilers (until the second edition of the C standard in 1999 Fortran did a much better job of handling the minutia of floating-point arithmetic) are mostly about figuring out how to distribute the execution of loops over multiple functional units (i.e., concurrent execution).

The elephant in the floating-point evaluation room is result accuracy. Compiler writers know they have to be careful not to throw away accuracy (e.g., optimizing out what appear to be redundant operations in the Kahan summation algorithm), but until recently nobody had any idea how to go about improving the accuracy of what had been written. In retrospect one accuracy improvement algorithm is obvious, try lots of possible combinations of the ways in which an expression can be written and pick the most accurate.

There are lots of ways in which the operands in an expression can be paired together to be operated on; some of the ways of pairing the operands in a+b+c+d include (a+b)+(c+d), a+(b+(c+d)) and (d+a)+(b+c) (unless the source explicitly includes parenthesis compilers for C, C++, Fortran and many other languages (not Java which is strictly left to right) are permitted to choose the pairing and order of evaluation). For n operands (assuming the operators have the same precedence and are commutative) the number is combinations is C_n * n! where C_n is the n’th Catalan number. For 5 operands there are 1680 combinations of which 120 are unique and for 10 operands 1.76432*10^10 of which 4.66074*10^7 are unique.

A recent study by Langlois, Martel and Thévenoux analysed the accuracy achieved by all unique permutations of ten operands on four different data sets. People within the same umbrella project are now working on integrating this kind of analysis into a compiler. This work is another example of the growing trend in compiler research of using the processing power provided by multiple cores to use algorithms that were previously unrealistic.

Over the last six years or so there has been lot of very interesting floating-point work going on in France, with gcc and llvm making use of the MPFR library (multiple-precision floating-point) for quite a while. Something very new and interesting is RangeLab which, given the lower/upper bounds of each input variable to a program (a simple C-like language) computes the range of the outputs as well as ranges for the roundoff errors (the tool assumes IEEE floating-point arithmetic). I now know that over the range [800, 1000] the expression x*(x+1) is a lot more accurate than x*x+x.

Program optimization given 1,000 datasets

January 10th, 2011 No comments

A recent paper reminded me of a consequence of widespread availability of multi-processor systems I had failed to mention in a previous post on compiler writing in the next decade. The wide spread availability of systems containing large numbers of processors opens up opportunities for both end users of compilers and compiler writers.

Some compiler optimizations involve making decisions about what parts of a program will be executed more frequently than other parts; usually speeding up the frequently executed at the expense of slowing down the less frequently executed. The flow of control through a program is often effected by the input it has been given.

Traditionally optimization tuning has been done by feeding a small number of input datasets into a small number of programs, with the lazy using only the SPEC benchmarks and the more conscientious (or perhaps driven by one very important customer) using a few more acquired over time. A few years ago the iterative compiler tuning community started to address this lack of input benchmark datasets by creating 20 datasets for each of their benchmark programs.

Twenty datasets was certainly a step up from a few. Now one group (Evaluating Iterative Optimization Across 1000 Data Sets; written by a team of six people) has used 1,000 different input data sets to evaluate the runtime performance of a program; in fact they test 32 different programs each having their own 1,000 data sets. Oh, one fact they forgot to mention in the abstract was that each of these 32 programs was compiled with 300 different combinations of compiler options before being fed the 1,000 datasets (another post talks about the problem of selecting which optimizations to perform and the order in which to perform them); so each program is executed 300,000 times.

Standing back from this one could ask why optimizers have to be ‘pre-tuned’ using fixed datasets and programs. For any program the best optimization results are obtained by profiling it processing large amounts of real life data and then feeding this profile data back to a recompilation of the original source. The problem with this form of optimization is that most users are not willing to invest the time and effort needed to collect the profile data.

Some people might ask if 1,000 datasets is too many, I would ask if it is enough. Optimization often involves trade-offs and benchmark datasets need to provide enough information to compiler writers that they can reliably tune their products. The authors of the paper are still analyzing their data and I imagine that reducing redundancy in their dataset is one area they are looking at. One topic not covered in their first paper, which I hope they plan to address, is how program power consumption varies across the different datasets.

Where next with the large multi-processor systems compiler writers now have available to them? Well, 32 programs is not really enough to claim reasonable coverage of all program characteristics that compilers are likely to encounter. A benchmark containing 1,000 different programs is the obvious next step. One major hurdle, apart from the people time involved, is finding 1,000 programs that have usable datasets associated with them.