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Posts Tagged ‘csv’

Converting graphs in pdf files to csv format

December 19th, 2013 4 comments

Looking at a graph displayed as part of a pdf document is so tantalizing; I want that data as a csv!

One way to get the data is to email the author(s) and ask for it. I do this regularly and sometimes get the apologetic reply that the data is confidential. But I can see the data! Yes, but we only got permission to distribute the paper. I understand their position and would give the same reply myself; when given access to a company’s confidential data, explicit permission is often given about what can and cannot be made public with lists of numbers being on the cannot list.

The Portable Document Format was designed to be device independent, which means it contains a description of what to display rather than a bit-map of pixels (ok, it can contain a bit-map of pixels (e.g., a photograph) but this rather defeats the purpose of using pdf). It ought to be possible to automatically extract the data points from a graph and doing this has been on my list of things to do for a while.

I was mooching around the internals of a pdf last night when I spotted the line: /Producer (R 2.8.1); the authors had used R to generate the graphs and I could look at the R source code to figure out what was going on :-). I suspected that each line of the form: /F1 1 Tf 1 Tr 6.21 0 0 6.21 135.35 423.79 Tm (l) Tj 0 Tr was a description of a circle on the page and the function PDF_Circle in the file src/library/grDevices/src/devPS.c told me what the numbers meant; I was in business!

I also managed to match up other lines in the pdf file to the output produced by the functions PDF_Line and PDFSimpleText; it looked like the circles were followed by the axis tick marks and the label on each tick mark. Could things get any easier?

In suck-it-and-see projects like this it is best to use very familiar tools, this allows cognition to be focused on the task at hand. For me this meant using awk to match lines in pdf files and print out the required information.

Running the pdf through an awk script produced what looked like sensible x/y coordinates for circles on the page, the stop/start end-points of lines and text labels with their x/y coordinates. Now I needed to map the page x/y coordinates to within graph coordinate points.

After the circle coordinates in the output from the script were a series of descriptions of very short lines which looked like axis tick marks to me, especially since they were followed by coordinates of numbers that matched what appeared in the pdf graphs. This information is all that is needed to map from page coordinates to within graph coordinates. The graph I was interested in (figure 6) used logarithmic axis, so things were made a bit complicated by the need to perform a log transform.

Running the output (after some cut and pasting to removed stuff associated with other graphs in the pdf) from the first script through another awk script produced a csv file that could be fed into R’s plot to produce a graph that looked just like the original!

Function point vs Cost index

I would say it is possible to extract the data points from any graph, generated using R producing pdf or ps, contained within a pdf file.

The current scripts are very specific to the figure I was interested in, this is more to do with my rough and ready approach to solving the problem which makes assumptions about that is in the data; a more sophisticated version could handle common variations on the theme and with a bit of elbow grease point-and-click might be made to work.

It is probably also possible to extract data points in graphs produced by other tools, ‘all’ that is needed is information on the encoding used.

Extracting data from graphs generated to an image format such as png or jpg are going to need image processing software such as that used to extract data from images of tables.

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O Cobol, Cobol! wherefore art thou Cobol?

February 12th, 2012 2 comments

Programming language popularity has been in the news again and as always Cobol is nowhere to be seen in the rankings. Even back in the day, when people in the know generally considered Cobol to be the most widely used language it often failed to appear, or appeared very low down, in language rankings. I think Cobol’s unrepresentative rankings occur because users of Cobol are assumed to hang out in the same places as users of other programming languages. The letters bo in the name is the clue, business oriented people are not usually interested in technical stuff and tend not to read the magazines (and these days web sites) that users of the other popular languages read.

Cobol is very business domain specific and does not contain functionality that makes it a reasonable choice for writing applications in other domains (it is possible to write a compiler in Cobol, for instance the Micro Focus compiler is written in Cobol). It has very sophisticated languages constructs for handling data having the most convoluted formats imaginable, essential in the business world which has to process data whose format has evolved over the years into a tangled mess (developers have to deal with spaghetti code, business has to deal with spaghetti data formats). Cobol’s control flow and code structuring facilities are primitive (all variables are global and the perform statement is very similar to the gosub statement found in Basic’s that are line number based) because business data processing tends to be relatively simple and programs to handle them are generally small (the large Cobol programs of legend are invariably made up of lots of small programs run in series with complicated data format dependencies between them).

I started to realise just how different Cobol is when working on my first Cobol code generator (yes it was written in Cobol). If a processor has lots of registers it is usually worthwhile to dedicate one to holding the value zero (of the 32 registers supported by most RISC processors, often only 31 can hold different values, one is dedicated to returning zero when read from and ignores any value written to it), in the case of Cobol it is considered worthwhile to dedicate a register to hold 0x20202020 (four space characters) rather than zero.

Is Cobol still the most widely used language today? No, I don’t think so. Business people love spreadsheets which means developers have switched to writing pre/post data format processing code, previously in Cobol, in Visual Basic (to convert input data into a form accepted by the spreadsheet and then print the results of the spreadsheet calculations in a presentable format); this Visual Basic source can often have a Cobol-like feel to it. This spreadsheet usage also resulted in the comma separated list becoming a widely used format for data representation, eroding Cobol’s unique selling point of sophisticated input/output data format processing.

What does language popularity mean? Does using a language you don’t like count towards it being popular? There are several languages I like and very rarely get to use, does this mean I don’t get to contribute to their popularity?

In these tough financial times the number of job adverts requiring knowledge of a specified language is probably of more interest than number of posts to web sites. One job search site lists 3,032 Cobol jobs and counting job ad hits for the top languages listed in a recent popularity poll puts Cobol at the bottom end of the cluster of highest ranked languages.

On mainframes I think Cobol is likely to still be No. 1; it is probably impossible to replace the dominant language in a niche market.