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Posts Tagged ‘combinatorics’

Number of possible different one line programs

February 22nd, 2012 No comments

Writing one line programs is a popular activity in some programming languages (e.g., awk and Perl). How many different one line programs is it possible to write?

First we need to get some idea of the maximum number of characters that written on one line. Microsoft Windows XP or later has a maximum command line length of 8191 characters, while Windows 2000 and Windows NT 4.0 have a 2047 limit. POSIX requires that _POSIX2_LINE_MAX have a value of at least 2048.

In 2048 characters it is possible to assign values to and use at least once 100 different variables (e.g., a1=2;a2=2.3;....; print a1+a2*a3...). To get a lower bound lets consider the number of different expressions it is possible to write. How many functionally different expressions containing 100 binary operators are there?

If a language has, say, eight binary operators (e.g., +, -, *, /, %, &, |, ^), then it is possible to write 8^100 right 2.03703598*10^90 visually different expressions containing 100 binary operators. Some of these expressions will be mathematically equivalent (adopting the convention of leaving out the operands), e.g., + * can also be written as * + (the appropriate operands will also have the be switched around).

If we just consider expressions created using the commutative operators (i.e., +, *, &, |, ^), then with these five operators it is possible to write 1170671511684728695563295535920396 mathematically different expressions containing 100 operators (assuming the common case that the five operators have different precedence levels, which means the different expressions have a one to one mapping to a rooted tree of height five); this 1.17067*10^33 is a lot smaller than 5^100 right 7.88860905*10^69.

Had the approximately 10^9 computers/smart phones in the world generated expressions at the rate of 10^6 per second since the start of the Universe, 4.336*10^17 seconds ago, then the 4.336*10^32 created so far would be almost half of the total possible.

Once we start including the non-commutative operators such a minus and divide the number of possible combinations really starts to climb and the calculation of the totals is real complicated. Since the Universe is not yet half way through the commutative operators I will leave working this total out for another day.

Update (later in the day)

To get some idea of the huge jump in number of functionally different expressions that occurs when operator ordering is significant, with just the three operators -, / and % is is possible to create 3^100 right 5.15377521*10^47 mathematically different expressions. This is a factor of 10^14 greater than generated by the five operators considered above.

If we consider expressions containing just one instance of the five commutative operators then the number of expressions jumps by another two orders of magnitude to 5*100*3^99. This count will continue to increase for a while as more commutative operators are added and then start to decline; I have not yet worked things through to find the maxima.

Update (April 2012).
Sequence A140606 in the On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences lists the number of inequivalent expressions involving n operands; whose first few values are: 1, 6, 68, 1170, 27142, 793002, 27914126, 1150212810, 54326011414, 2894532443154, 171800282010062, 11243812043430330, 804596872359480358, 62506696942427106498, 5239819196582605428254, 471480120474696200252970, 45328694990444455796547766, 4637556923393331549190920306

Christmas books for 2009

December 7th, 2009 No comments

I thought it would be useful to list the books that gripped me one way or another this year (and may be last year since I don’t usually track such things closely); perhaps they will give you some ideas to add to your Christmas present wish list (please make your own suggestions in the Comments). Most of the books were published a few years ago, I maintain piles of books ordered by when I plan to read them and books migrate between piles until eventually read. Looking at the list I don’t seem to have read many good books this year, perhaps I am spending too much time reading blogs.

These books contain plenty of facts backed up by numbers and an analytic approach and are ordered by physical size.

The New Science of Strong Materials by J. E. Gordon. Ideal for train journeys since it is a small book that can be read in small chunks and is not too taxing. Offers lots of insight into those properties of various materials that are needed to build things (‘new’ here means postwar).

Europe at War 1939-1945 by Norman Davies. A fascinating analysis of the war from a numbers perspective. It is hard to escape the conclusion that in the grand scheme of things us plucky Brits made a rather small contribution, although subsequent Hollywood output has suggested otherwise. Also a contender for a train book.

Japanese English language and culture contact by James Stanlaw. If you are into Japanese culture you will love this, otherwise avoid.

Evolutionary Dynamics by Martin A. Nowak. For the more mathematical folk and plenty of thought power needed. Some very powerful general results from simple processes.

Analytic Combinatorics by Philippe Flajolet and Robert Sedgewick. Probably the toughest mathematical book I have kept at (yet to get close to the end) in a few years. If number sequences fascinate you then give it a try (a pdf is available).

Probability and Computing by Michael Mitzenmacher and Eli Upfal. For the more mathematical folk and plenty of thought power needed. Don’t let the density of Theorems put you off, the approach is broad brush. Plenty of interesting results with applications to solving problems using algorithms containing a randomizing component.

Network Algorithmics by George Varghese. A real hackers book. Not so much a book about algorithms used to solve networking problems but a book about making engineering trade-offs and using every ounce of computing functionality to solve problems having severe resource and real-time constraints.

Virtual Machines by James E. Smith and Ravi Nair. Everything you every wanted to know about virtual machines and more.

Biological Psychology by James W. Kalat. This might be a coffee table book for scientists. Great illustrations, concise explanations, the nuts and bolts of how our bodies runs at the protein/DNA level.