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Posts Tagged ‘CHILL’

The oldest compiler still in production use is?

August 31st, 2012 No comments

What is the oldest compiler still in production use?

A CHILL compiler I worked on a long time ago has probably been in production use for 30 years now.

Code gets added and deleted from production software all the time, how might ‘oldest’ be measured? I propose using the mean age of every line of code, including comments, where the age of a line is reset to zero when it is modified in any way (excluding code formatting).

The following are two environmental factors that enable a production compiler to get very old:

  • a relatively obscure language: popular languages have new compilers written for them (compiler death through competition) or have new features added to them (requiring new lines of code which could even displace ‘aged’ code),
  • a very long lived application associated with the language: obscure languages tend to be very quickly abandoned in the dust of history unless they have a symbiotic relationship with an important application,
  • very long lived host hardware and target processor: changing either often requires substantial new code or a move to a newer compiler. For ancient the only candidate is the IBM 370 and just really old the Intel 80×80, Zilog Z80.

Virtual machines provide a mechanism to be host hardware independent. The Micro Focus Cobol had a rewrite in the early 1990s (it might have had others since) and I don’t think UCSD Pascal I.5 is still used for production work.

Fortran is an evolving language and very popular in some application domains. I doubt there are any (mean age) old Fortran compilers in production use.

Why do I put forward the ITT (in its International Telephone & Telegraph days, these bits subsequently sold off) CHILL compiler as potentially the oldest compiler currently in production use?

  • Obscure language and long lived application (telephone switching software),
  • host hardware was IBM 370 family, target processor Intel 8086 (later updated to support 80386),
  • large development team and very small support team (i.e., lots of old code and small changes over the years),
  • single customer, i.e., no push to add features to attract new customers or keep existing ones.

My last conversation with anybody associated with this compiler was a chance meeting over 10 years ago, so I might be a bit out of date.

30+ year old source code for compilers can be downloaded (e.g., the original PDP 11 C compiler) but these compilers are not in production use (forgotten about military installations anybody?)

I welcome other proposals for the oldest compiler currently in production use.

Type compatibility the hard way

January 14th, 2012 No comments

When writing in assembly language it is possible to operate on a sequence of bits as if it were an unsigned integer one moment and a floating-point number the next; it is the developer’s responsibility to ensure that a given sequence of bits is operated on in a consistent manner. The concept of type was initially introduced into computer languages to provide information to compilers, enabling them to generate the appropriate instructions for values having the specified type and where necessary to convert values from the representation used by one type to the representation used by a different type. At this early stage language designers tended to keep things simple and to think in terms of what made sense at the machine representation level when deciding which type conversions to permit (PL/1 was a notable exception and the convolutions that occurred to perform some type conversions are legendary).

It took around 10 years for high level languages to evolve to the point where developers had the ability to create their own named types; Pascal being an early, very well known and stand out example. Once developers could create their own types it became necessary to come up with general rules specifying when a compiler must treat two different types as compatible (i.e., be required to generate code to support some set of operations between variables having these two different types).

Most language designers chose the simple option; a type is compatible with another type if it has the same name (scoping/namespace/lookup rules effectively meant that “same name” was effectively the same as “same definition”). This simple option generally included various exceptions for the arithmetic types; developers did not like having to insert explicit casts for what they considered to be obvious conversions (languages such as Ada/CHILL provided a mechanism for developers to specify that a newly defined arithmetic type really was a completely new type that was not compatible with any other arithmetic type, an explicit cast could change this).

One of the few languages which took a non-simple approach to type compatibility was CHILL, a language for which I once spent over a year writing the semantics phase of a compiler. CHILL uses what is known as structural compatibility, i.e., essentially two types are compatible if they have the same layout in memory (the language definition actually uses the terms similar and equivalent rather than compatible and uses mode rather than type, here I will follow modern general terminology). This has obvious advantages when there is a need to overlay types used in different parts of a program onto the same location in storage (note, no requirements on the fields being the same). CHILL definitions look like a mixture of C and Pascal, unless you know PL/1 they can look odd to the uninitiated (I think I’ve got them right, my CHILL is very rusty), T_1 and T_2 are compatible:

T_1 = struct (               T_2 = struct (
      f1 :int;                     f3 :int;
      f2 :int;                     f4 :int;
      );                           );

Structural compatibility enables the creation some rather unusual compatible types, such as the following three types all being pair-wise compatible (the keyword ref is use to specify pointer types):

T_3 = struct (               T_4 = struct (             T_5 = struct (
      f1 :int;                     f4 :int;                   f7 :int;
      f2 :ref T_3;                 f5 :ref T_4;               f8 :ref T_5;
      f3 :ref T_4;                 f6 :ref T_3;               f9 :ref T_5;
      );                           );                         );

Because types can be recursive it is possible for the compatibility checking code in the compiler to end up having to type check the type it is currently checking. The solution adopted by many CHILL compilers (not that there were ever many) was to associate an is_currently_being_checked flag with every type’s symbol table entry, if during compatibility checking this flag has value TRUE for both types then they are both compatible otherwise the flag is set to TRUE for both types and checking continues (all flags are set to FALSE at the end of compatibility checking).

To check T_3 and T_4 In the above code set the is_currently_being_checked flag to TRUE and iterate over the fields in each record. The first field pair have the same type, the second field pair are pointers to types we are already checking and therefore compatible, as are the third field pair, so the types are compatible. Checking T_3 and T_5 requires a second iteration through T_5 because of the pointer to T_4 which does not yet have its is_currently_being_checked flag set.

Yours truely discovered that one flag was not sufficient to do fully correct compatibility checking. It is necessary to maintain a stack of locations (e.g., the structure field or procedure parameter where compatibility checking has to recurse to check a user defined type) in the two types being compared in order to detect that some types were not compatible. In the following example (involving pointer to procedure types; which is longer than I remember the actual instance I first discovered being, but I had to create it again from vague memories and my CHILL expertise has faded; suggestions welcome) types A and B would be considered compatible using the is_currently_being_checked flag approach because by the time the last parameter is checked both symbol table flags have been set. You can see by inspection that types X and Y are not compatible (they have a different number of parameters to start with). Looking at the stack of previous compatibility checks for A/B would show that no X/Y compatibility check had yet been made and one would be needed for the third parameter (which would fail):

A = proc(X, Y,            X);
B = proc(C, proc(A, int), Y);
 
C = proc(E);
D = proc(A);
E = proc(proc(X, proc(A, int), X));
 
X = proc(D);
Y = proc(A, int);

The potential for complexity created by the use of structural compatibility is one reason why its use is rare. While it is possible to rationalize that CHILL was targeted at embedded telecommunication systems containing lots of code where memory costs can be significant, I suspect that those involved had a hardware mentality and a poor grasp of practical software engineering issues.

Incidentally, the design of the llvm type checking system relies on using an equality test to check for type equality. While this decision will increase the difficulty of integrating languages that use structural type compatibility into llvm, these languages are probably sufficiently rare that it is much more cost effective to make it simple to implement the more common languages.

Where did type compatibility go next? Well, over the last 20 years the juggernaut of object oriented design has pretty much excluded sophisticated non-OO type systems from mainstream languages (e.g., C++ and Java), but that is a topic for another article.

Criteria for knowing a language

December 23rd, 2008 1 comment

What does it mean for somebody to claim to know a computer language? In the commercial world it means the person is claiming to be capable of fluently (i.e., only using knowledge contained in their head and without having to unduly ponder) reading, and writing code in some generally accepted style applicable to that language. The academic world generally sets a much lower standard of competence (perhaps because most of its inhabitants leave before any significant expertise is acquired). If I had a penny for every recent graduate who claimed to know a language and was incapable of writing a program that read in a list of integers and printed their sum (I know companies that set tougher problems but they do not seem to have higher failure rates), I would be a rich man.

One experiment asked 21 postgraduate and academic staff which of the following individuals they would regard as knowing Java:

  • A cannot program in Java, but knows that Java is a popular programming language.
  • B cannot write a Java program from scratch, but can make very simple changes to an existing Java program (such as changing a string constant that specifies a URL).
  • C can use a tool such as JBuilder to write a very simple Java program, but cannot use control flow constructs such as while loops.
  • D can write Java programs that use while loops, arrays, and the Java class libraries, but only within one class; she cannot write a program that consists of several classes.
  • E can create complex Java programs and classes, but needs to occasionally refer to documentation for details of the Java language and class libraries
  • The results were:

    _ NO YES
    A 21  0
    B 18  3
    C 16  5
    D  8 13
    E  0 21

    These answers reflect the environment from which the subjects were drawn. When I wrote compilers for a living I did not consider that anybody knew a language unless they had written a compiler for it, a point of view echoed by other compiler writers I knew.

    I’m not sure that commercial developers would be happy with answer (E), in fact they could probably expand (E) into five separate questions that tested the degree to which a person was able to combine various elements of the language to create a meaningful whole. In the commercial world stage (E) is where people are expected to start.

    The criteria used to decide whether somebody knows a language depends on which group of people you talk to; academics, professional developers and compiler writers each have their own in-group standards. In a sense the question is irrelevant, a small amount of language knowledge applied well can be used to do a reasonable job of creating a program for most applications.