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Posts Tagged ‘agency detection’

Telepathic communication with a Supreme Being

December 31st, 2012 1 comment

Every year the Christmas cards I receive are a reminder of how seriously a surprisingly large percentage of software developers I know take their beliefs in a Supreme Being.

Surely anybody possessing the skills needed to do well in software engineering would have little trouble uncovering for themselves the significant inconsistencies in any system of beliefs intended to support the existence of a Supreme Being? The evidence from my Christmas card collection shows that some very bright would disagree with me.

This Christmas I have finally been able to come up with some plausible sounding hand waving that leaves me feeling as if I at least have a handle on this previously incomprehensible (to me) behavior.

The insight is to stop considering the Supreme Being question as a problem in logic (i.e., is there a model consistent with belief in a Supreme Being that is also consistent with the known laws of Physics) and start thinking of it was a problem in explaining structure. Love of structure is a key requirement for anybody wanting to get seriously involved with software development (a basic ability to ‘do logic’ is also required, but logic is just another tool and outside of introductory courses and TV shows is vastly overrated).

On the handful of occasions I have spoken to developers about religion (in general I try to avoid this subject, it is just too contentious) things have always boiled down to one of having core belief, a feeling that random is just not a good enough explanation for things being the way they are, while the existence of a Supreme Being slots rather well into their world view.

The human agency detection system has been proposed as one of the reasons for religion; see Scott Atran’s book “In Gods We Trust: The evolutionary landscape of religion” for a fascinating analysis of various cognitive, social and economic factors that create a landscape favoring the existence of some form of religion.

Of course anybody choosing to go with a Supreme Being model has to make significant adjustments to other components of their world view and some of these changes will generate internal inconsistencies. Any developer who has ever been involved in building a large system will have experienced the strange sensation of seeing a system they know to be internally inconsistent function in a fashion that appears perfectly acceptable to everybody involved; listening to users’ views of the system brings more revelations (how could anybody think that was how it worked?) Having had these experiences with insignificantly small systems (compared to the Universe) I can see why some developers might be willing to let slide inconsistencies generated by inserting a Supreme Being into their world view.

I think the reason I don’t have a Supreme Being in my world view is that I am too in love with the experimental method, show me some repeatable experiments and I would be willing to take a Supreme Being more seriously. Perhaps at the end of the day it does all boil down to personal taste.

At the personal level I can see why people are not keen to discuss their telepathic communication sessions (or pray to use one of the nontechnical terms) with their Supreme Being. Having to use a channel having a signal/noise ratio that low must be very frustrating.