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Information on computers from the 1970s and earlier

July 7th, 2017 No comments

A collection of links to sources of hardware and software related information from the 1970s and earlier.

Computers and Automation, a monthly journal published between 1954 and 1978, by far and away the best source of detailed information from this period. The June issue contained an extensive computer directory and buyers guide, including a census of installed computers. The collected census for 1962-1974 must rank in the top ten of pdf files that need to be reliably converted to text.

Computer characteristics quarterly, the title says it all; the stories about the weird and wonderful computers that used to be on sale really are true. Only a couple of issues available online at the moment.

Bitsavers huge collection of scanned computer manuals. The directory listing of computer companies is a resource in its own right.

DTIC (Defense Technical Information Center). A treasure trove of work sponsored by the US military from the time of Rome and late.

Ed Thelan’s computer history: note his contains material that can be hard to find via the main page, e.g., the BRL 1961 report.

“Inventory of Automatic data processing equipment in the Federal Government”: There are all sorts of interesting documents lurking in pdfs waiting to be found by the right search query.

Books

“Software Reliability” by Thayer, Lipow and Nelson is now available online.

The Economics of Computers” by William F. Sharpe contains lots of analysis and data on computer purchase/leasing and usage/performace details from the mid-1960s.

“Data processing technology and economics” by Montgomery Phister is still only available in dead tree form (and uses up a substantial amount of tree).

Missing in Action

“A Study of Technological Innovation: The Evolution of Digital Computers”, Kenneth Knight’s PhD thesis at Carnegie Institute of Technology, published in 1963. Given Knight’s later work, this will probably be a very interesting read.

“Computer Survey”, compiled by Mr Peddar, was a quarterly list of computers installed in the UK. It relied on readers (paper) mailing in details of computers in use. There are a handful of references and that’s all I can find.

What have I missed? Suggests and links very welcome.

Increase your citation count, send me your data!

June 30th, 2017 2 comments

I regularly email people asking for a copy of the data used in a paper they wrote. In around 32% of cases I don’t get any reply, around 12% promise to send the data when they are less busy (a few say they are just too busy) and every now and again people ask why I want the data.

After 6-12 months, I email again saying that I am still interested in their data; a few have replied with apologies and the data.

I need a new strategy to motivate people to spend some time tracking down their data and sending it to me; there are now over 200 data-sets possibly lost forever!

I think those motivated by the greater good will have already responded. It is time to appeal to baser instincts, e.g., self-interest. The currency of academic life is paper citations, which translate into status in the community, which translate into greater likelihood of grant proposals being accepted (i.e., money to do what they want to do).

Sending data gets researchers one citation in my book (I am ruthless about not citing a paper if I don’t get any data).

My current argument is that once their data is publicly available (and advertised in my book) lots of other researchers will use it and more citation to their work will follow; they also get an exclusive, I only use one data-set for each topic (actually data is hard to get hold of, so the exclusivity offer is spin).

To back up my advertising claims I point out that influential people are writing about my book and it’s all over social media. If you want me to add you to the list of influential people, send me a link to what you have written (I have no shame).

If you write about my book, please talk about the data and that researchers who make their data public are the only ones who deserve funding and may citations rain down on them.

That is the carrot approach, how can I apply some stick to motivate people?

I could point out that if they don’t send me their data their work is doomed to obscurity, because I will use somebody else’s (skipping over the minor detail of data being hard to find). Research has found that people are less willing to share their data if the strength of the evidence is weak; calling out somebody like that is do-or-die.

If you write about my book, please talk about the data and point out that researchers who don’t make their data public have something to hide and should not be funded.

Since the start of 2017, researchers in the UK receiving government research grants are required to archive their data and make it available. This is good for future researchers, but not a lot of use for me now.

What do readers think? Ideas and suggestions welcome.

Whole-program optimization: there’s gold in them hills

June 29th, 2017 No comments

Information is the life-blood of compiler optimization and compiler writers are always saying “If only this-or-that were known, we could do this optimization.”

Burrowing down the knowing this-or-that rabbit-hole leads to requiring that code generation be delayed until link-time, because it is only at link-time that all the necessary information is available.

Whole program optimization, as it is known, has been a reality in the major desktop compilers for several years, in part because computers having 64G+ of memory have become generally available (compiler optimization has always been limited by the amount of memory available in developer computers). By reality, I mean compilers support whole-program-optimization flags and do some optimizations that require holding a representation of the entire program in memory (even Microsoft, not a company known for leading edge compiler products {although they have leading edge compiler people in their research group} supports an option having this name).

It is still early days for optimizations that are “whole-program”, rather like the early days of code optimization (when things like loop unrolling were leading edge and even constant folding was not common).

An annoying developer characteristic is writing code that calls a function every five statements, on average. Calling a function means that all those potentially reusable values that have been loaded into registers, before the call, cannot be safely used after the call (figuring out whether it is worth saving/restoring around the call is hard; yes developers, its all your fault that us compiler writers have such a tough job :-P).

Solutions to the function call problem include inlining and flow-analysis to figure out the consequences of the call. However, the called function calls other functions which in-turn burrow further down the rabbit hole.

With whole-program optimization, all the code is available for analysis; given enough memory and processor time lots of useful information can be figured out. Most functions are only called once, so there are lots of savings to be had from using known parameter values (many are numeric literals) to figure out whether an if-statement is necessary (i.e., is dead code) and how many times loops iterate.

More fully applying known techniques is the obvious easy use-case for whole-program optimization, but the savings probably won’t be that big. What about new techniques that previously could not even be attempted?

For instance, walking data structures until some condition is met is a common operation. Loading the field/member being tested and the next/prev field, results in one or more cache lines being filled (on the assumption that values adjacent in storage are likely to be accessed in the immediate future). However, data structures often contain many fields, only a few of which need to be accessed during the search process, when the next value needed is in another instance of the struct/record/class it is unlikely to already be available in the loaded cache line. One useful optimization is to split the data structure into two structures, one holding the fields accessed during the iterative search and the other holding everything else. This data-remapping means that cache lines are more likely to contain the next value accessed approaches increases the likelihood that cache lines will hold a values needed in the near future; the compiler looks after the details. Performance gains of 27% have been reported

One study of C++ found that on average 12% of members were dead, i.e., never accessed in the code. Removing these saved 4.4% of storage, but again the potential performance gain comes from improve the cache hit ratio.

The row/column storage layout of arrays is not cache friendly, using Morton-order layout can have a big performance impact.

There are really really big savings to be had by providing compilers with a means of controlling the processors caches, e.g., instructions to load and flush cache lines. At the moment researchers are limited to simulations show that substantial power savings+some performance gain are possible.

Go forth and think “whole-program”.

How indeterminate is an indeterminate value?

June 18th, 2017 9 comments

One of the unwritten design aims of the C Standard is that it should be possible to fully implement the C Standard library in conforming C. It turned out that this was not possible in C90; the problem was implementing the memcpy function when the object being copied was an object having a struct type containing one or more padding bytes. The memcpy library function copies the bytes in one object to another object. The padding bytes might be uninitialized (they have an indeterminate value), which means accessing them is undefined behavior (in C90), i.e., use of memcpy for copying structs containing padding results in a non-conforming program.

struct {
        char c; // Occupies 1 byte
        // Possible padding bytes here
        int i;  // A 2/4-byte int sometimes has to be aligned on a 2/4-byte storage boundary
       };

Padding bytes could be set to a known value by, for instance, using memcpy to zero the storage; requiring this usage was thought to be excessive, and a hefty chunk of new words was added in C99 (some of the issues raised by this problem also cropped up elsewhere, which contributed to the will to do this).

One consequence of the new wording is that objects having type unsigned char are special in that while their uninitialized value is still indeterminate, the possible set of values excludes a trap representation, they have an unspecified value making accesses unspecified behavior (which conforming programs can contain). The uninitialized value of objects having other types can be a trap representation; it’s the possibility of a value being a trap representation that makes accessing such uninitialized objects undefined behavior.

All well and good, memcpy can now be implemented in conforming C(99) by copying unsigned chars.

Having made it possible for a conforming program to access an uninitialized object (having type unsigned char), questions about it actual value can be asked. Its value is indeterminate you say, the clue is in the term indeterminate value. Ok, what does the following value function return?

unsigned char random(void)
{
unsigned char x;
 
return x ^ x;
}

Exclusiving-oring a value with itself always produces zero. An unsigned char taking, say, values 0 to 255, pick one and you always get zero; case closed. But where does it say that an indeterminate value is always the same value? There is no wording preventing an indeterminate value being different every time it is accessed. The sound of people not breathing could be heard when this was pointed out to WG14 (the C Standard’s committee), followed by furious argument on one side or the other.

The following illustrates one situation where the value of padding bytes could change with every access. That volatile qualifier specifies that the value of c could change between two accesses (e.g., it represents the storage layout of some memory mapped I/O device). Perhaps any padding bytes following it are also effectively volatile-qualified.

struct {
        volatile char c; // A changeable 1 byte
        // Possible padding bytes may be volatile
        int i;  // No volatility here
       };

The local object x, above, is not associated with a volatile-qualified object. But, so what? Another unwritten design aim of the C Standard is to keep the wording simple, so edge cases are not called out and the behavior intended to handle padding bytes gets applied to local unsigned chars.

A compiler could decide that calls to random always return zero, based on the assumption that while indeterminate values may not be known, they are not time varying.

Experiment, replicate, replicate, replicate,…

June 14th, 2017 No comments

Popular science writing often talks about how one experiment proved this-or-that theory or disproved ‘existing theories’. In practice, it takes a lot more than one experiment before people are willing to accept a new theory or drop an existing theory. Many, many experiments are involved, but things need to be simplified for a popular audience and so one experiment emerges to represent the pivotal moment.

The idea of one experiment being enough to validate a theory has seeped into the world view of software engineering (and perhaps other domains as well). This thinking is evident in articles where one experiment is cited as proof for this-or-that and I am regularly asked what recommendations can be extracted from the results discussed in my empirical software book (which contains very few replications, because they rarely exist). This is a very wrong.

A statistically significant experimental result is a positive signal that the measured behavior might be real. The space of possible experiments is vast and any signal that narrows the search space is very welcome. Multiple replication, by others and with variations on the experimental conditions (to gain an understanding of limits/boundaries), are needed first to provide confidence the behavior is repeatable and then to provide data for building practical models.

Psychology is currently going through a replication crisis. The incentive structure for researchers is not to replicate and for journals not to publish replications. The Reproducibility Project is doing some amazing work.

Software engineering has had an experiment problem for decades (the problem is lack of experiments), but this is slowly starting to change. A replication problem is in the future.

Single experiments do have uses other than helping to build a case for a theory. They can be useful in ruling out proposed theories; results that are very different from those predicted can require ideas to be substantially modified or thrown away.

In the short term (i.e., at least the next five years) the benefit of experiments is in ruling out possibilities, as well as providing general pointers to the possible shape of things. Theories backed by substantial replications are many years away.

Unappreciated bubble research

June 7th, 2017 1 comment

Every now and again an academic journal dedicates a single issue to one topic. I laughed when I saw the topic of an upcoming special issue on “Enhancing Credibility of Empirical Software Engineering”.

If you work in industry, you probably have a completely different interpretation of the intent of this issue, compared to somebody working in academia, i.e., you think the topic is about getting academic researchers to work on stuff of interest to industry. In academia the issue is about getting industry to treat the research work being done in universities as relevant to their needs, i.e., industry just does not appreciate how useful the work being done in universities is to solving real world problems.

Yes fellow industrialists, the credibility problem is all down to us not appreciating the work of those hard-working academics (I was once at a university meeting and the Dean referred to the industrialists at the meeting, which confused me because I did not know any were present; sometime later the penny dropped and I realised he was talking abut me and another guy who was working in industry).

The real problem is that most research academics have little idea what goes on in industry and what research results might be of interest to industry. This is not surprising given that the academic career ladder keeps people within the confines of the university bubble.

I regularly have academics express surprise that somebody in industry, i.e., me, knows about this-that-or-the-other. This baffled me for a while, until I realised that many academics really do regard people working in industry as simpletons; I now reply that its because I paid more for my degree and did not have the usual labotomy before graduating. Now they are baffled.

The solution to the problem of industrial research relevance is for academics to be willing to move outside the university bubble, to go out and interact with people in industry. However, there are powerful incentives pushing academics away from talking to industry:

  • academic performance is measured by papers published and the chances of getting a paper published are improved if it involves a fashionable topic (yes fellow industrialists, academics suffer from this problem too). Stuff that industry is interested in is not fashionable, at least not yet. I don’t see many researchers being willing to risk working on very unfashionable topics in the hope that their work might get published,
  • contact with industry will open the eyes of many academics to the interesting work being done there and the much higher paying jobs available (at least for those who are any good). Heads’ of department don’t want to lose their good people and have every incentive to discourage researchers having any contact with industry. The senior staff are sufficiently embedded in the system that they can be trusted to talk to industry, rather like senior communist party members being allowed to visit the West during the cold war.

An alternative way for academic research to connect with industry is for the research to be done by people with a lot of industry experience. There are a surprising number of people working in industry who are bored and are contemplating doing a PhD for something interesting to do (e.g., a public proclamation).

Again there are powerful incentives pushing against industry contact. PhD students do the academic grunt work and so compliant people are needed, i.e., recent graduates who will accept that this is how things work, not independent people who know better (such as those with a decent amount of industry experience). Worries about industrialists not being willing to tow-the-line with respect to departmental thinking are probably groundless, plenty of this sort of thing goes on in industry.

I found out at the weekend that only one central London university offers a computing related part-time PhD program (Birkbeck; few people can afford to a significant drop in income); part-time students are not around to do the grunt work.

Signaling cognitive firepower as a software developer

May 31st, 2017 2 comments

Female Peacock mate selection is driven by the number of ‘eyes’ in the tail of the available males; the more the better. Supporting a large fancy tail is biologically expensive for the male and so tail quality is a reliable signal of reproductive fitness.

A university degree used to be a reliable signal of the cognitive firepower of its owner, a quality of interest to employers looking to fill jobs that required such firepower.

Some time ago the UK government expressed the desire for 50% of the population to attend university (when I went to university the figure was around 5%). These days a university degree is a signal of being desperate for a job to start paying off a large debt and having an IQ in the top 50% of the population. Dumbing down is the elephant in the room.

The idea behind shifting the payment of tuition fees from the state to the student, was that as paying customers students would somehow actively ensure that universities taught stuff that was useful for getting a job. In my day lecturers laughed when students asked them about the relevance of the material being taught to working in industry; those that persisted had their motives for attending university questioned. I’m not sure that the material taught these days is anymore relevant to industry than it was in my day, but students don’t get laughed at (at least not to their face) and there is more engagement.

What could universities teach that is useful in industry? For some subjects the possible subject matter can at least be delineated (e.g., becoming a doctor), while for others a good knowledge of what is currently known about how the universe works and a familiarity with some of the maths involved is the most that can sensibly be covered in three years (when the final job of the student is unknown).

Software development related jobs often prize knowledge of the application domain above knowledge that might be learned on a computing degree, e.g., accounting knowledge when developing software for accounting systems, chemistry knowledge when working of chemical engineering software, and so on. Employers don’t want to employ people who are going to spend all their time working on the kind of issues their computing lecturers have taught them to be concerned about.

Despite the hype, computing does not appear to be as popular as other STEM subjects. I don’t see this as a problem.

With universities falling over themselves to award computing degrees to anybody who can pay and is willing to sit around for three years, how can employers separate the wheat from the chaff?

Asking a potential employee to solve a simple coding problem is a remarkably effective filter. By simple, I mean something that can be coded in 10 lines or so (e.g., read in two numbers and print their sum). There is no need to require any knowledge of fancy algorithms, the wheat/chaff division is very sharp.

The secret is to ask them to solve the problem in their head and then speak the code (or, more often than not, say it as the solution is coded in their head, with the usual edits, etc).

Burger flippers with STEM degrees

May 30th, 2017 2 comments

There continues to be a lot of fuss over the shortage of STEM staff (Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). But analysis of the employment data suggests there is no STEM shortage.

One figure than jumps out is the unemployment rate for computing graduates, why is this rate of so consistently much higher than other STEM graduates, 12% vs. under 9% for the rest?

Based on my somewhat limited experience of sitting on industrial panels in university IT departments (the intended purpose of such panels is to provide industry input, but in practice we are there to rubber stamp what the department has already decided to do) and talking with recent graduates, I would explain the situation described above was follows:

The dynamics from the suppliers’ side (i.e., the Universities) is that students want a STEM degree, students are the customer (i.e., they are paying) and so the university had better provide degrees that the customer can pass (e.g., minimise the maths content and make having to learn how to program optional on computing courses). Students get a STEM degree, but those taking the ‘easy’ route are unemployable in STEM jobs.

There is not a shortage of people with STEM degrees, but there is a shortage of people with STEM degrees who can walk the talk.

Today’s burger flippers have STEM degrees that did not require students to do any serious maths or learn to program.

Tags:

Evidence for 28 possible compilers in 1957

May 21st, 2017 2 comments

In two earlier posts I discussed the early compilers for languages that are still widely used today and a report from 1963 showing how nothing has changed in programming languages

The Handbook of Automation Computation and Control Volume 2, published in 1959, contains some interesting information. In particular Table 23 (below) is a list of “Automatic Coding Systems” (containing over 110 systems from 1957, or which 54 have a cross in the compiler column):

Computer System Name or      Developed by        Code M.L. Assem Inter Comp Oper-Date Indexing Fl-Pt Symb. Algeb.
           Acronym   
IBM 704 AFAC                 Allison G.M.         C                      X    Sep 57    M2       M    2      X
        CAGE                 General Electric                 X          X    Nov 55    M2       M    2
        FORC                 Redstone Arsenal                            X    Jun 57    M2       M    2      X
        FORTRAN              IBM                  R                      X    Jan 57    M2       M    2      X
        NYAP                 IBM                              X               Jan 56    M2       M    2
        PACT IA              Pact Group                                  X    Jan 57    M2       M    1
        REG-SYMBOLIC         Los Alamos                       X               Nov 55    M2       M    1
        SAP                  United Aircraft      R           X               Apr 56    M2       M    2 
        NYDPP                Servo Bur. Corp.                 X               Sep 57    M2       M    2 
        KOMPILER3            UCRL Livermore                              X    Mar 58    M2       M    2      X
IBM 701 ACOM                 Allison G.M.         C                X          Dec 54    S1       S    0
        BACAIC               Boeing Seattle       A           X          X    Jul 55             S    1      X
        BAP                  UC Berkeley                X     X               May 57                  2
        DOUGLAS              Douglas SM                       X               May 53             S    1
        DUAL                 Los Alamos                 X          X          Mar 53             S    1
        607                  Los Alamos                       X               Sep 53                  1
        FLOP                 Lockheed Calif.            X     X    X          Mar 53             S    1 
        JCS 13               Rand Corp.                       X               Dec 53                  1
        KOMPILER 2           UCRL Livermore                              X    Oct 55    S2            1      X
        NAA ASSEMBLY         N. Am. Aviation                       X
        PACT I               Pact Groupb          R                      X    Jun 55    S2            1
        QUEASY               NOTS Inyokern                         X          Jan 55             S
        QUICK                Douglas ES                            X          Jun 53             S    0
        SHACO                Los Alamos                            X          Apr 53             S    1
        SO 2                 IBM                              X               Apr 53                  1
        SPEEDCODING          IBM                  R           X    X          Apr 53    S1       S    1
IBM 705-1, 2 ACOM            Allison G.M.         C                X          Apr 57    S1            0
        AUTOCODER            IBM                  R    X      X          X    Dec 56             S    2
        ELI                  Equitable Life       C                X          May 57    S1            0
        FAIR                 Eastman Kodak                         X          Jan 57             S    0
        PRINT I              IBM                  R    X      X    X          Oct 56    82       S    2
        SYMB. ASSEM.         IBM                              X               Jan 56             S    1
        SOHIO                Std. Oil of Ohio          X      X    X          May 56    S1       S    1
        FORTRAN              IBM-Guide            A                      X    Nov 58    S2       S    2      X
        IT                   Std. Oil of Ohio     C                      X              S2       S    1      X
        AFAC                 Allison G.M.         C                      X              S2       S    2      X
IBM 705-3 FORTRAN            IBM-Guide            A                      X    Dec 58    M2       M    2      X
        AUTOCODER            IBM                  A           X          X    Sep 58             S    2
IBM 702 AUTOCODER            IBM                       X      X          X    Apr 55             S    1
        ASSEMBLY             IBM                              X               Jun 54                  1
        SCRIPT G. E.         Hanford              R    X      X    X     X    Jul 55    Sl       S    1 
IBM 709 FORTRAN              IBM                  A                      X    Jan 59    M2       M    2      X
        SCAT                 IBM-Share            R           X          X    Nov 58    M2       M    2
IBM 650 ADES II              Naval Ord. Lab                              X    Feb 56    S2       S    1      X
        BACAIC               Boeing Seattle       C           X    X     X    Aug 56             S    1      X
        BALITAC              M.I.T.                    X      X          X    Jan 56    Sl            2
        BELL L1              Bell Tel. Labs            X           X          Aug 55    Sl       S    0
        BELL L2,L3           Bell Tel. Labs            X           X          Sep 55    Sl       S    0
        DRUCO I              IBM                                   X          Sep 54             S    0
        EASE II              Allison G.M.                     X    X          Sep 56    S2       S    2
        ELI                  Equitable Life       C                X          May 57    Sl            0
        ESCAPE               Curtiss-Wright                   X    X     X    Jan 57    Sl       S    2
        FLAIR                Lockheed MSD, Ga.         X           X          Feb 55    Sl       S    0
        FOR TRANSIT          IBM-Carnegie Tech.   A                      X    Oct 57    S2       S    2      X
        IT                   Carnegie Tech.       C                      X    Feb 57    S2       S    1      X
        MITILAC              M.I.T.                    X           X          Jul 55    Sl       S    2
        OMNICODE             G. E. Hanford                         X     X    Dec 56    Sl       S    2
        RELATIVE             Allison G.M.                     X               Aug 55    Sl       S    1
        SIR                  IBM                                   X          May 56             S    2
        SOAP I               IBM                              X               Nov 55                  2
	SOAP II              IBM                  R           X               Nov 56    M        M    2
        SPEED CODING         Redstone Arsenal          X           X          Sep 55    Sl       S    0
        SPUR                 Boeing Wichita            X      X    X          Aug 56    M        S    1
        FORTRAN (650T)       IBM                  A                      X    Jan 59    M2       M    2
Sperry Rand 1103A COMPILER I  Boeing Seattle                  X          X    May 57             S    1      X
        FAP                  Lockheed MSD              X           X          Oct 56    Sl       S    0
        MISHAP               Lockheed MSD                     X               Oct 56    M1       S    1
        RAWOOP-SNAP          Ramo-Wooldridge                  X    X          Jun 57    M1       M    1
        TRANS-USE            Holloman A.F.B.                  X               Nov 56    M1       S    2
        USE                  Ramo-Wooldridge      R           X          X    Feb 57    M1       M    2
        IT                   Carn. Tech.-R-W      C                      X    Dec 57    S2       S    1      X
        UNICODE              R Rand St. Paul      R                      X    Jan 59    S2       M    2      X
Sperry Rand 1103 CHIP        Wright A.D.C.             X           X          Feb 56    S1       S    0
        FLIP/SPUR            Convair San Diego         X           X          Jun 55    SI       S    0
        RAWOOP               Ramo-Wooldridge      R           X               Mar 55    S1            1
        8NAP                 Ramo-Wooldridge      R           X    X          Aug 55    S1       S    1
Sperry Rand Univac I and II AO Remington Rand          X      X          X    May 52    S1       S    1
        Al                   Remington Rand            X      X          X    Jan 53    S1       S    1
        A2                   Remington Rand            X      X          X    Aug 53    S1       S    1
        A3,ARITHMATIC        Remington Rand       C    X      X          X    Apr 56    SI       S    1
        AT3,MATHMATIC        Remington Rand       C           X          X    Jun 56    SI       S    2      X
        BO,FLOWMATIC         Remington Rand       A    X      X          X    Dec 56    S2       S    2
        BIOR                 Remington Rand            X      X          X    Apr 55                  1
        GP                   Remington Rand       R    X      X          X    Jan 57    S2       S    1
        MJS (UNIVAC I)       UCRL Livermore            X      X               Jun 56                  1
        NYU,OMNIFAX          New York Univ.                              X    Feb 54             S    1
        RELCODE              Remington Rand            X      X               Apr 56                  1
        SHORT CODE           Remington Rand            X           X          Feb 51             S    1
        X-I                  Remington Rand       C    X      X               Jan 56                  1
        IT                   Case Institute       C                      X              S2       S    1      X
        MATRIX MATH          Franklin Inst.                              X    Jan 58    
Sperry Rand File Compo ABC   R Rand St. Paul                                  Jun 58
Sperry Rand Larc K5          UCRL Livermore                   X          X              M2       M    2      X
        SAIL                 UCRL Livermore                   X                         M2       M    2
Burroughs Datatron 201, 205 DATACODEI Burroughs                          X    Aug 57    MS1      S    1
        DUMBO                Babcock and Wilcox                    X     X   
        IT                   Purdue Univ.         A                      X    Jul 57    S2       S    1      X
        SAC                  Electrodata               X      X               Aug 56             M    1
        UGLIAC               United Gas Corp.                      X          Dec 56             S    0
                               Dow Chemical                        X
        STAR                 Electrodata                      X
Burroughs UDEC III UDECIN-I  Burroughs                             X              57    M/S       S   1
        UDECOM-3             Burroughs                                   X        57    M         S   1
M.I.T. Whirlwind ALGEBRAIC   M.I.T.               R                      X              S2        S   1      X
        COMPREHENSIVE        M.I.T.                    X      X    X          Nov 52    Sl        S   1
        SUMMER SESSION       M.I.T.                                X          Jun 53    Sl        S   1
Midac   EASIAC               Univ. of Michigan                     X     X    Aug 54    SI        S
        MAGIC                Univ. of Michigan         X      X          X    Jan 54    Sl        S
Datamatic ABC I              Datamatic Corp.                             X   
Ferranti TRANSCODE           Univ. of Toronto     R           X    X     X    Aug 54    M1        S
Illiac DEC INPUT             Univ. of Illinois    R           X               Sep 52    SI        S
Johnniac EASY FOX            Rand Corp.           R           X               Oct 55              S
Norc NORC COMPILER           Naval Ord. Lab                   X          X    Aug 55    M2        M
Seac BASE 00                 Natl. Bur. Stds.          X           X
        UNIV. CODE           Moore School                                X    Apr 55

Chart Symbols used:

Code
R = Recommended for this computer, sometimes only for heavy usage.
C = Common language for more than one computer.
A = System is both recommended and has common language.
 
Indexing
M = Actual Index registers or B boxes in machine hardware.
S = Index registers simulated in synthetic language of system.
1 = Limited form of indexing, either stopped undirectionally or by one word only, or having
certain registers applicable to only certain variables, or not compound (by combination of
contents of registers).
2 = General form, any variable may be indexed by anyone or combination of registers which may
be freely incremented or decremented by any amount.
 
Floating point
M = Inherent in machine hardware.
S = Simulated in language.
 
Symbolism
0 = None.
1 = Limited, either regional, relative or exactly computable.
2 = Fully descriptive English word or symbol combination which is descriptive of the variable
or the assigned storage.
 
Algebraic
A single continuous algebraic formula statement may be made. Processor has mechanisms for
applying associative and commutative laws to form operative program.
 
M.L. = Machine language.
Assem. = Assemblers.
Inter. = Interpreters.
Compl. = Compilers.

Are the compilers really compilers as we know them today, or is this terminology that has not yet settled down? The computer terminology chapter refers readers interested in Assembler, Compiler and Interpreter to the entry for Routine:

Routine. A set of instructions arranged in proper sequence to cause a computer to perform a desired operation or series of operations, such as the solution of a mathematical problem.

Compiler (compiling routine), an executive routine which, before the desired computation is started, translates a program expressed in pseudo-code into machine code (or into another pseudo-code for further translation by an interpreter).

Assemble, to integrate the subroutines (supplied, selected, or generated) into the main routine, i.e., to adapt, to specialize to the task at hand by means of preset parameters; to orient, to change relative and symbolic addresses to absolute form; to incorporate, to place in storage.

Interpreter (interpretive routine), an executive routine which, as the computation progresses, translates a stored program expressed in some machine-like pseudo-code into machine code and performs the indicated operations, by means of subroutines, as they are translated. …”

The definition of “Assemble” sounds more like a link-load than an assembler.

When the coding system has a cross in both the assembler and compiler column, I suspect we are dealing with what would be called an assembler today. There are 28 crosses in the Compiler column that do not have a corresponding entry in the assembler column; does this mean there were 28 compilers in existence in 1957? I can imagine many of the languages being very simple (the fashionability of creating programming languages was already being called out in 1963), so producing a compiler for them would be feasible.

The citation given for Table 23 contains a few typos. I think the correct reference is: Bemer, Robert W. “The Status of Automatic Programming for Scientific Problems.” Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Computer Applications Symposium, 107-117. Armour Research Foundation, Illinois Institute of Technology, Oct. 24-25, 1957.

Programming Languages: nothing changes

May 14th, 2017 No comments

While rummaging around today I came across: Programming Languages and Standardization in Command and Control by J. P. Haverty and R. L. Patrick.

Much of this report could have been written in 2013, but it was actually written fifty years earlier; the date is given away by “… the effort to develop programming languages to increase programmer productivity is barely eight years old.”

Much of the sound and fury over programming languages is the result of zealous proponents touting them as the solution to the “programming problem.”

I don’t think any major new sources of sound and fury have come to the fore.

… the designing of programming languages became fashionable.

Has it ever gone out of fashion?

Now the proliferation of languages increased rapidly as almost every user who developed a minor variant on one of the early languages rushed into publication, with the resultant sharp increase in acronyms. In addition, some languages were designed practically in vacuo. They did not grow out of the needs of a particular user, but were designed as someone’s “best guess” as to what the user needed (in some cases they appeared to be designed for the sake of designing).

My post on this subject was written 49 years later.

…a computer user, who has invested a million dollars in programming, is shocked to find himself almost trapped to stay with the same computer or transistorized computer of the same logical design as his old one because his problem has been written in the language of that computer, then patched and repatched, while his personnel has changed in such a way that nobody on his staff can say precisely what the data processing Job is that his machine is now doing with sufficient clarity to make it easy to rewrite the application in the language of another machine.

Vendor lock-in has always been good for business.

Perhaps the most flagrantly overstated claim made for POLs is that they result in better understanding of the programming operation by higher-level management.

I don’t think I have ever heard this claim made. But then my programming experience started a bit later than this report.

… many applications do not require the services of an expert programmer.

Ssshh! Such talk is bad for business.

The cost of producing a modern compiler, checking it out, documenting it, and seeing it through initial field use, easily exceeds $500,000.

For ‘big-company’ written compilers this number has not changed much over the years. Of course man+dog written compilers are a lot cheaper and new companies looking to aggressively enter the market can spend an order of magnitude more.

In a young rapidly growing field major advances come so quickly or are so obvious that instituting a measurement program is probably a waste of time.

True.

At some point, however, as a field matures, the costs of a major advance become significant.

Hopefully this point in time has now arrived.

Language design is still as much an art as it is a science. The evaluation of programming languages is therefore much akin to art criticism–and as questionable.

Calling such a vanity driven activity an ‘art’ only helps glorify it.

Programming languages represent an attack on the “programming problem,” but only on a portion of it–and not a very substantial portion.

In fact, it is probably very insubstantial.

Much of the “programming problem” centers on the lack of well-trained experienced people–a lack not overcome by the use of a POL.

Nothing changes.

The following table is for those of you complaining about how long it takes to compile code these days. I once had to compile some Coral 66 on an Elliot 903, the compiler resided in 5(?) boxes of paper tape, one box per compiler pass. Compilation involved: reading the paper tape containing the first pass into the computer, running this program and then reading the paper tape containing the program source, then reading the second paper tape containing the next compiler pass (there was not enough memory to store all compiler passes at once), which processed the in-memory output of the first pass; this process was repeated for each successive pass, producing a paper tape output of the compiled code. I suspect that compiling on the machines listed gave the programmers involved plenty of exercise and practice splicing snapped paper-tape.

Computer   Cobol statements   Machine instructions   Compile time (mins)
UNIVAC II     630                    1,950                240
RCA 501       410                    2,132                 72
GE 225        328                    4,300                 16
IBM 1410      174                      968                 46
NCR 304       453                      804                 40