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Almost all published analysis of fault data is worthless

Faults are the subject of more published papers that any other subject in empirical software engineering. Unfortunately, over 98.5% of these fault related papers are at best worthless and at worst harmful, i.e., make recommendations whose impact may increase the number of faults.

The reason most fault papers are worthless is the data they use and the data they don’t to use.

The data used

Data on faults in programs used to be hard to obtain, a friend in a company that maintained a fault database was needed. Open source changed this. Now public fault tracking systems are available containing tens, or even hundreds, of thousands of reported faults. Anybody can report a fault, and unfortunately anybody does; there is a lot of noise mixed in with the signal. One study found 43% of reported faults were enhancement requests, the same underlying fault is reported multiple times (most eventually get marked as duplicate, at the cost of much wasted time) and …

Fault tracking systems don’t always contain all known faults. One study found that the really important faults are handled via email discussion lists, i.e., they are important enough to require involving people directly.

Other problems with fault data include: biased reported of problems, reported problem caused by a fault in a third-party library, and reported problem being intermittent or not reproducible.

Data cleaning is the essential first step that many of those who analyze fault data fail to perform.

The data not used

Users cause faults, i.e., if nobody ever used the software, no faults would be reported. This statement is as accurate as saying: “Source code causes faults”.

Reported faults are the result of software being used with a set of inputs that causes the execution of some sequence of tokens in the source code to have an effect that was not intended.

The number and kind of reported faults in a program depends on the variety of the input and the number of faults in the code.

Most fault related studies do not include any user related usage data in their analysis (the few that do really stand out from the crowd), which can lead to very wrong conclusions being drawn.

User usage data is very hard to obtain, but without it many kinds of evidence-based fault analysis are doomed to fail (giving completely misleading answers).

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