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A survey of opinions on the behavior of various C constructs

The Cerberus project, researching C semantics, has written up the results of their survey of ‘expert’ C users (short version and long detailed version). I took part in the original survey and at times found myself having to second guess what the questioner was asking; the people involved were/are still learning how C works. Anyway, many of the replies provide interesting insights into current developer interpretation of the behavior of various C constructs (while many of the respondents were compiler writers, it looks like some of them were not C compiler writers).

Some of those working on the Cerberus project are proposing changes to the C standard based on issues they encountered while writing a formal specification for parts of C and are bolstering their argument, in part, using the results of their survey. In many ways the content of the C Standard was derived from a survey of those attending WG14 meetings (or rather x3j11 meetings back in the day).

I think there is zero probability that any of these proposed changes will make it into a revised C standard; none of the reasons are technical and include:

  • If it isn’t broken, don’t fix it. Lots of people have successfully implemented compilers based on the text of the standard, which is the purpose of the document. Where is the cost/benefit of changing the wording to enable a formal specification using one particular mathematical notation?
  • WG14 receives lots of requests for changes to the C Standard and has an implicit filtering process. If the person making the request thinks the change is important, they will:
    • put the effort into wording the proposal in the stylized form used for language change proposals (i.e., not intersperse changes in a long document discussing another matter),
    • be regular attendees of WG14 meetings, working with committee members on committee business and helping to navigate their proposals through the process (turning up to part of a meeting will see your proposal disappear as soon as you leave the building; the next WG14 meeting is in London during April).

It could be argued that having to attend many meetings around the world favors those working for large companies. In practice only a few large companies see any benefit in sending an employee to a standard’s meeting for a week to work on something that may be of long term benefit them (sometimes a hardware company who wants to make sure that C can be compiled efficiently to their processors).

The standard’s creation process is about stability (don’t break existing code; many years ago a company voted against a revision to the Cobol standard because they had lost the source code to one of their products and could not check whether the proposed updates would break this code) and broad appeal (not narrow interests).

Update: Herb Sutter’s C++ trip report gives an interesting overview of the process adopted by WG21.

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