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Creating a map showing land covered by rising sea levels

I joined the Geekli.st climate Hackathon this weekend at the Hub Westminster (my favorite venue for Hackathons). While the organizers had lots of enthusiasm they had very little in the way of data for us to work on. No problem, ever since the Flood-relief hackathon I have wanted to use the SRTM ‘whole Earth’ elevation data on a flood related hack. Since this was a climate change related hack the obvious thing to do was to use the data to map the impact of any increases in sea level (try it, with wording for stronger believers).

The hacking officially started Friday evening at 19:00, but I only attended the evening event to meet people and form a team. Rob Finean was interested in the idea of mapping the effects of sea a rise in level (he also had previous experience using leaflet, a JavaScript library for interactive maps) and we formed a team, Florian Rathgeber joined us on Saturday morning.

I downloaded all the data for Eurasia (5.6G) when I got home Friday night and arriving back at the hackthon on Saturday morning started by writing a C program to convert the 5,876 files, each 1-degree by 1-degree squares on the surface of the Earth, to csv files.

The next step was to fit a mesh to the data and then locate constant altitude contours, at 0.5m and 1.5m above current sea level. Fitting a 2-D mesh to the data was easy (I wanted to use least squares rather than splines so that errors in the measurements could be taken into account), as was plotting and drawing contours, but getting the actual values for the contour lat/long proved to be elusive. I got bogged down looking at Python code, Florian knew a lot more Python than me and started looking for a Python solution while I investigated what R had to offer. Given the volume of data a Python solution looked like the best fit for the work-flow.

By late afternoon no real progress had been made and things were not looking good. Google searches on the obvious keywords returned lots of links to contour plotting libraries and papers claiming to have found a better contour evaluation algorithm, but no standalone libraries. I was reduced to downloading the source code of R to search for the code it used to calculate contours, with a view to extracting the code for my own use.

Rob wanted us to produce kml (Keyhole Markup Language) that his front end could read to render an overlay on a map.

At almost the same time Florian found that GDAL (Geospatial Data Abstraction Library) could convert hgt files (the raw SRTM file format) to kml and I discovered the R contourLines function. Florian had worked with GDAl before but having just completed his PhD had to leave to finish a paper he was working on, leaving us with instruction on the required options.

The kml output by GDAL was great for displaying contours, but did not fill in the enclosed area. The output I was generating using R filled the area enclosed by the contours but contained lots of noise because independent contours were treated having a connection to each other. I knew a script could be written to produce the desired output from the raw data, but did not know if GDAL had options to do what we wanted.

Its all very well being able to write a script to produce the desired output, but what is the desired output? Rob was able to figure out how the contour fill data had to be formatted in the kml file and I generated this using R, awk, sed, shell scripts and around six hours of cpu time on my laptop.

Rob’s front end uses leaflet with mapping data from Openstreetmap and the kml files to create a fantastic looking user-configurable map showing the effect of 0.5m and 1.5 rises in sea level.

The sea level data on the displayed map only shows the south of England and some of the north coast of Europe because loading any more results in poor performance (it is all loaded statically). Support is needed for dynamically loading of data on an as required basis. All of the kml files for Eurasia with 1.5 sea level rise are up on Github (900M+ of data). At the moment the contour data is only at the most detailed level of resolution and less detailed resolution is needed for when users zoom out. R’s contourLines function has no arguments for changing the resolution of which it returns; if you know of a better contour library please let me know.

The maps show average sea level. When tides are taken into account the sea level at certain times of the day may be a lot higher in some areas. We did not have access to tide data and would not have had time to make use of it anyway, so the effects of tide on sea level are not included.

Some of the speckling in the overlays may be noise caused by the error bounds of the SRTM data (around 6m for Eurasia; an accuracy level that makes our expectation of a difference between 0.5m and 1.5m contours problematic).

  1. Bryan Hanson
    September 16th, 2014 at 06:54 | #1

    It’s not obvious from the documentation, but you can change the resolution of the contour lines returned by contourLines by not accepting the defaults on x and y. For instance, x defaults to x = seq(0, 1, length.out = nrow(z)) so if z has 10 rows, the contours might look rather ‘jaggy’. But you can set it to something like 10*nrow(z) and you will get much smoother contours, but it will also take longer to compute.

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