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Archive for August, 2014

undefined behavior: pay up or shut up

August 31st, 2014 2 comments

Academia recently discovered undefined behavior in C, twenty five years after industry tool vendors first started trying to help developers catch the problems it causes. Some of the tools that are now being written are doing stuff that we could only dream about back in the day.

The forces that morph occurrences of undefined behavior in source code to unwanted behavior during program execution have changed over the years.

  • When developers paid for their compilers there was an incentive for compiler writers to try to be nice to developers by doing the right thing for undefined behaviors. Twenty five years ago there were lots of commercial compilers all having slightly different views about what the right thing might be; a lot of code was regularly ported to different compilers and got to encounter different compiler writer’s views.
  • These days there is widespread use of open source compilers, which developers don’t pay for, removing the incentive for compilers writers to be nice to developers. Paying customers want support for new processors, enhancements to existing generated code quality and the sexy topic for PhDs is code optimization; what better climate for treating source containing undefined behavior as road kill. Now developers only need to upgrade to a later release of the compiler they are using to encounter an unexpected handling of undefined behavior.

A recent blog post, authored by some of the academics alluded to above, proposes adding a new option to gcc: -std=friendly-c. If developers feel that this kind of option needs to be supported then they should contribute to a crowdfunding campaign (none exists at the time of writing) to raise, say, $500,000 towards supporting the creation and ongoing support for the functionality behind this option. Of course one developer’s friendly is another developer’s unfriendly, so we could end up with multiple funds each promoting an option that supports a view of the world that is specific to one target environment.

At the moment, in response to user complaints, Open source compiler vendors lamely point out that the C standard permits them to handle source containing undefined behaviors the way they do; they stop short of telling people to quit complaining and that they are getting the compiler for free.

If this undefined behavior issue starts to gain substantial publicity, but insufficient funding, open source compiler vendors will need to start putting a positive spin on the decisions they make. Not being in marketing I might have a problem keeping a straight face when giving the following positive messages:

  • We are helping to save the world: optimized programs use less power (ok, every now and again they can use more). Do you really want to stop us adding more optimizations just because you cannot find the time to fix a mistake in your code?
  • We are helping your application gain market share. Applications that are not actively maintained are less and less likely to continue to work with every release of the compiler.

Self-driving cars, is it safer on the inside or the outside?

August 28th, 2014 No comments

The UK Department for Transport: Seeks views on a regulatory framework for the safe testing of self-driving cars on UK roads.

I was driving home one Christmas and saw an obviously drunk man trying to work up the momentum to cross the road. I honked my horn and flashed my lights, he fell backwards into a large puddle on the muddy grass. It is unlikely that a self-driving car would have acted as I did, perhaps the drunk would have stepped out in front of the car when it was too close to brake to a stop before colliding with him.

What should the default behavior of self-driving cars be when somebody steps out in front of them, when breaking while driving in the same direction will result in a collision?

The simplest technical solution is to collide with the pedestrian.

If the road is clear an improved solution is to include ‘change direction’ to the list of possible actions for the car to take. This could still result in an accident, but one that only damaged the car and not any people.

What if the road is not clear, perhaps there is a large lorry coming towards us and lots of large trees on my side of the road. In this case I don’t want ‘change direction’ included in the list of possible actions.

What if a couple of school children step in front of my self-driving car and it is not safe for the car to change direction? Does the government require the car software to make a cost/benefit decision about who gets priority in the minimize pain and suffering calculation? I don’t fancy my chances against a couple of school children in that calculation. I can see the government delaying implementation of that feature until self-driving cars become established.

There is a positive benefit to having cars make cost/benefit decisions about life/death/serious injury, it will reduce traffic by encouraging people to share cars (sharing increases the human value of the car contents, making it less likely that they are the ones to suffer).

What about user options. Will I be able to show the car picture of family members and instruct it to give higher priority to them than non-family? The people in the car coming in the opposite direction that I collided with to avoid hitting a family member might be a bit put out that it only happened because I had changed the default collision priorities.

You have until 11:45pm on 19 September 2014 to send the Department for Transport your views.

The government are obviously keen on this idea; they are offering funding “… to towns or cities to develop testing grounds for driverless cars.” Plenty of opportunities for cutting youth unemployment here.

Evidence for the benefits of strong typing, where is it?

August 27th, 2014 2 comments

It is often claimed that writing software using a strongly typed programming language bestows worthwhile benefits. Those making the claims can sometimes be rather vague about exactly what the benefits are, while at other times appear willing to claim almost any benefit. What does the empirical evidence have to say (let’s ignore the what languages are strongly typed elephant in the room)?

Until recently there had been two empirical studies (plus a couple of language comparison experiments; one of the better ones involves the researcher timing himself implementing various algorithms in various languages; Zislis “An Experiment in Algorithm Implementation”), while in the last few years a group has been experimenting away in Germany (three’ish published data sets).

Measuring changes in developer performance caused by the use of different programming languages is very hard, some of the problems include:

  • every person is different: a way needs to be found to take account of differences in subject ability/knowledge/characteristics,
  • every problem is different: it may be easier to write a program to solve a problem using language X than using language Y,
  • it is difficult to obtain experimental subjects.

The experimental procedure adopted by all the experiments discussed here is to:

  1. select two different languages or the same language modified to not support some type constructs,
  2. get students (mostly upper-undergraduates+graduates) to volunteer as experimental subjects,
  3. have each subject use one language to solve a problem and then use the other language to solve the same problem. Each subject is randomly assigned to a group using a given language order (the experiments start out with an equal number of subjects in each group, but not all subjects complete every problem),
  4. in some cases the previous step is repeated for new problems.

Having subjects solve the same problem twice creates the opportunity for learning to occur during the implementation of the first program and for this learning to improve performance during the second implementation. The experimental procedures employed generate information that can be used during the analysis of the data (in my case using a mixed-model in R; download code and all data) to factor this ordering effect into the created model.

So what are the results? In chronological order we have (if you know of anymore published work please tell me):

  • Gannon “An Experimental Evaluation of Data Type Conversions”: Implemented compilers for two simple languages (think BCPL and BCPL+a string type and simple structures; by today’s standards one language is not quiet as weakly typed as the other). One problem had to be solved and this was designed to require the use of features available in both languages, e.g., a string oriented problem (final programs were between 50-300 lines). The result data included number of errors during development and number of runs needed to create a working program (this all happened in 1977, well before the era of personal computers, when batch processing was king).

    There was a small language difference in number of errors/batch submissions; the difference was about half the size of that due to the order in which languages were used by subjects, both of which were small in comparison to the variation due to subject performance differences. While the language effect was small, it exists. To what extent Can the difference be said to be due to stronger typing rather than only one language having built in support for a string type? Who knows, no more experiments like this were performed for 20 years

  • Prechelt & Tichy A Controlled Experiment to Assess the Benefits of Procedure Argument Type Checking: Used two C compilers, one K&R C (i.e., no argument checking of function calls) and the other ANSI C, with subjects solving one problem using both compilers; available output data was time taken by subjects to solve the problem.

    Using the no argument checking compiler slowed implementation time by around 10%, about five times smaller than the variation in subject performance (there was an ordering effect of around 30%).

  • Mayer, Kleinschmager & Hanenberg: Two experiments used different languages (Java and Groovy) and multiple problems; result data was time for subjects to complete the task (Do Static Type Systems Improve the Maintainability of Software Systems? An Empirical Study and An Empirical Study of the Influence of Static Type Systems on the Usability of Undocumented Software). No significant difference due to just language (surprisingly) but differences due to language order, but big differences due to language/problem interaction with some problems solved more quickly in Java and other more quickly in Groovy. Again large variation due to subject performance.

    Another experiment used a single language (Java) and multiple problems involving making use of either Java’s generic types or non-generic types (“Do Developers Benefit from Generic Types?”). Again the only significant language difference effects occurred through interaction with other variables in the experiment (e.g., the problem or the language ordering) and again there were large variations in subject performance.

In summary, when a language typing/feature effect has been found its contribution to overall developer performance has been small.

I think some reasons that the effects of typing have been so small, or non-existent, include (I should declare my belief that strong typing is useful):

  • the use of students as subjects. Most students have very little programming experience relative to professional developers (i.e., under 100 hours vs. thousands of hours). I can easily imagine many student subjects often finding the warnings produced by the type system more confusing than helpful. More experienced developers are in a position to make full use of what a type system offers, and researchers should try to use professional developers as subjects (it is not that hard to obtain such volunteers)
  • the small size of the problems. Typing comes into its own when used to organize and control large amounts of code. I understand the constraints of running an experiment limit the amount of code involved.

C++14 is now in, C++11 is out and C++17 is on the horizon

August 18th, 2014 No comments

C++11 is now so yesterday; ISO have just ratified C++14 as the new C++ standard. However, don’t let the sudden halt to the exponential growth in page count with each revision (1334 pages in C++11 to 1366 in C++14) lull you into thinking that the size of C++ has stabilized. These days the page growth market is Technical Reports (e.g., ISO/IEC TR 18015 – C++ Performance and TR 19768 – C++ Library Extensions).

What next, are the C++ committee taking a well earned rest from their twice yearly (only recently reduced from four times a year) jetset around the world to attend week long meetings with 100+ other like-minded folk?

Of course not, they are having too much fun the world needs C++17 (yes, work has already started). And lets not forget the economy, which is still limping along. Can we risk the economic consequences of lots of highly paid consultants being unemployed, of compiler writers running out of new features to implement, of hotels having no more “Latest features in C++” seminars/workshops/conferences to host?

In there really enough work for everybody to do revising C++14? Better be safe and request permission from ISO to start work on new Technical Reports covering: C++ Extensions for Transactional Memory, C++ Extensions for Library Fundamentals and C++ Extensions for Parallelism (there is ongoing work/talk of others, such as C++ — File System Technical Specification, C++ Extensions for Concurrency and C++ Extensions for Concepts).

If the number of new things to add does start to run low, there are always the known bugs in the existing documents could always do with some attention: Core Language Active Issues and the Standard Library Issues List.

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