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Success: Software engineering data is starting to become very dull

A few years ago it was unusual for the author(s) of a paper in software engineering to make their data public (and on top of that it was rare to encounter a paper that actually made use of empirical data). The situation now is that I am having trouble keeping up with all the papers that include a link to downloadable data. Part of the problem is that I will pay a lot more attention to papers that come with data, having lived through a long famine I have not yet adjusted to the greater abundance. I’m sure that journal editors and referees are in the same boat and are being lured by accompanying data to accept paper for publication that they would otherwise have rejected.

This growing quantity of empirical software engineering data means we can now start thinking about what data is useful to have and what data is not so useful. Data is useful if it highlights a pattern of behavior that can be used to help reduce the resources needed to create/maintain software.

To get a handle on estimating data usefulness we need a model of research in software engineering. While many have used Physics as the model for software engineering research (i.e., a few simple universal laws that apply everywhere), I think Biology is a much better fit.

Software is written in different habitats environments (e.g., small teams, large teams) and targets different habitats environments (e.g., embedded, desktop, mobile, supercomputer) using different techniques and driven by different predators/prey market forces (e.g., release first/quickly, be reliable). Yes there are common drivers, just as the living things studied by biologists share a common need to eat, sleep and reproduce.

Like biology, the bulk of software engineering research is about the study of niche topics, with some small percentage of researchers trying to build theories that tie everything together at one level or another to create bigger pictures.

This model of software engineering research means estimating the usefulness of data probably requires some knowledge of the niche to which it applies. It also means that a particular data set might not be useful yet because it needs to be combined with other data, that does not yet exist (perhaps it was collected first because it was easier to do).

So in a space of a few years most software engineering data has gone from being very interesting (because it is rare) to being very dull (because it is harder to stand out in a crowd).

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