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Reality in the world of programming language standards

I see a lot of steam being vented about the standards’ process as applied to programming languages and software related topics. Knowing something about how the process works might help people live calmer lives, at least once they have calmed down after reading this article. What I have to say applies to programming language standards because these are what I have been involved with, as a member and convener of various UK and international committtees, for 25+ years.

  • ISO and your national standards’ body don’t care about the standard you are talking about.

    These organizations are monopolies who are required to demonstrate that documented procedures are followed by all concerned. Can you think of any organizational structure that would create less incentives for those on the inside to listen to those on the outside?

    Yes, these organizations do sell standards but the sales model is all about the long tail and no peak, to speak of, of best sellers. The real business model for running a standards’ organization is to either charge members a fee (your country pays membership dues for each Standards Committee it wants a say in; if your country has not paid to be a member of ISO JTC 1/SC22 you have no say in programming language standards. ANSI in the US charges people for the right to volunteer their time to attend meetings to work on a standard) and/or rely on government subsidy.

    Not being cared about is actually a luxury that people who work in programming language standards should aspire to. The bureaucrats who work in standards hate us; here in the UK there has been at least one attempt to kill off work on programming language standards and I have heard of similar experiences in other countries. The problem is that the standards we produce don’t fit the mold that works for most other standards; programming language standards contain an order of magnitude more pages than the average standard (until recently there was a print run of new standards which then had to be stored until sold and the volume occupied by programming language standards was of note {so I’m reliably informed}), take longer to produce (i.e., more work for the bureaucrats) and all this cost is not justified by the sales figures (which are confidential and last time I saw them only just required me to take my shoes and socks off to count).

  • Standards are created by the volunteers who regularly turn up at meetings.

    It is only the enthusiasm of these volunteers that makes the process work. If you don’t turn up at meetings then what you think does not count (not quite true, something you write might influence the thinking of one of the worker bees who attends meetings resulting in wording in the standard).

    If you really are interested in a standard then become an active member of the committee responsible for it, at least the national one and if you have the time the international one

  • Committee documents can be made public.

    There are no rules preventing a standards committee putting its documents on a website for Joe public to download. The issue is finding somebody willing to do the work of hosting the website (the programming language world is lucky to have Keld Simonsen) and a willingness of committee members to be open about all their documents.

    Looking in from the outside it seems to me that many non-programming language committees want to maintain an aura of mystic and privileged access.

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