Home > Uncategorized > sizeof i++

sizeof i++

November 11th, 2009

It is quite common for coding guideline documents to contain at least one guideline recommending against the use of a construct that developers very rarely use, for instance: “The operand of the sizeof operator shall not contain side-effects.”

... sizeof i++; // Is the author expecting i to be incremented?

Why do such recommendations get incorporated into guideline documents? The obvious answer is that their author(s) are unaware of actual developer usage and believe the recommendation has value.

I have heard people claim that such recommendations are harmless, after all the adherence cost is minimal. Besides, the fact that code very likely already adheres to it will increase the “pass” rate for the set of guidelines the first time developers check their code. However, such guidelines unjustifiably increase peoples confidence in software (as measured by the number of guidelines adhered to). They not only fail to add value to a set of coding guidelines, but their presence could result in the probity of the other guidelines being questioned.

I continue to be surprised by the amount of resistance encountered by my attempts to have the “sizeof” guideline removed from, or not included in, a set of coding guidelines. In the case of an existing set of guidelines there is obviously a resistance to change, but I have not yet managed to extract a single promise to consider removing the guideline in a future revision.

People seem unimpressed by the amount of source code I have searched in a vain attempt to find a violation of the “sizeof” guideline, but they often have some vague memory of having seen an instance of this elusive usage. My questions asking after the name of the source file, the name of the program, the name of the project, or simply the name of the company they were working for at the time are greeted with uncertainty. Perhaps the only instance they have seen is in the example underneath the text of the recommendation? Growls and pointed looks.

Another factor is existing practice, if it appears in other guideline documents it must have some benefit. People don’t want to go out on a limb. Besides, basing decisions on measurement of source code, who does that these days?

Whatever else might be said about the “sizeof” guideline, it does make a great example that developers can use to regale management.

Superior tone: Less experienced developers
Earnest voice: don’t always have a complete understanding of C/C++
Shock: They make the mistake of thinking
Talking very fast: that the code sizeof i++
Incredulity: will cause i to be incremented!
Emphasis: This guideline
Relieved voice: ensures that this mistake os warned about.

This article originally appeared in an earlier blog of mine which I did not keep up.

Comments are closed.